• ... publishes positive and negative studies based on sounded data and not the perception of significance. Learn more.
  • ... is where graduates and fellows become reviewers and editors. Learn more.
  • ... acknowledges the hard work of scientists and compensates for their invaluable services. Learn more.
  • ... believes that scientists should be commended for sharing their years of research and not be charged to publish them. Learn more.
  • ... wants scientists to focus on the science by providing free copyediting on all accepted manuscripts. Learn more.
  • ... is more than just a journal; it's a centralized hub to learn, share, create and expand on knowledge and opportunities. Learn more.
  • ... is a collaboration among companies, scientists and the philanthropic communities to advance research and education. Learn more.
  • ... changes the business of publishing, science and academia. Learn more.

June 2014

Progressive Science officially launched as an open access, peer-reviewed research journal on February 2014. It is started by a scientist, run by scientists and funded by philanthropy. Its core principle is that scientist should not have to pay to publish their hard work and discoveries. Its mission is to facilitate the transparency and universal accessibility of knowledge and information to everyone.

It is rare that science is perfect the first time, but we try our best to get as close to reality as possible; only time will tell. Big steps, little steps, as long as they move science forward to pave the way for new discoveries. 

Based on this philosophy, Progressive Science aims to publish all knowledge (original research, reviews, case reports, methodology, negative studies, brief reports, etc...) in the area of medicine, biology, chemistry and physics, while maintaining the accuracy and integrity of its publications. Advancement in science and discovery is not just leaps but single steps built from cumulative studies of negative and positive findings. Sloppy science and sloppy research lead to detrimental and costly misdirection. 

Progressive Science's goal is to publish all knowledge without judging on perception of significance and novelty. This site is a resource and a playground for scientists and is not just a database. Publishing science should be dynamic and enjoyable. Progressive Science publications contain colorful figures and videos showcasing the research and visions of the article's investigators. Science is a community effort. We invite visitors to comment and rate on the articles. 

Support our mission in the advancement of education and scientific research by submitting manuscripts, joining the editorial board, contributing to the Resources and Opportunities sections, promoting the SMART Award, and donating to our nonprofit organization, TranScience.

Interactive Science

Progressive Science has created a unique section below each article for your comments and review. Your inputs of the articles are critical to the advancement of science, knowledge and research. Every article is just a piece of a puzzle. Your input will build upon it and shine greater insight.  

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Compensation System
Progressive Science strongly believes that scientists should be acknowledged and compensated for their expertise and invaluable contributions to the editorial and review process. Ironically, scientists are being charged publication fees while generously providing free labor as reviewers and editors. In the hope of changing this practice, Progressive Science has implemented a compensation system.

For Reviewers (manuscript evaluation must be completed within 16 days):
  1. Monetary
  2. Publication Point
  3. SMART Award Donation
For Academic Editors: one publication point is given for each submission handled. Six publication points = one article publication cost credit.  
Implementation






Image ID
  • July 2014

    Answer: ?
    Winner: ?

    Identify this image and win a $25 Starbucks gift card to the first correct responder. Send your answer to editor@pscience.org.

    Question: What is deficient in this mouse?

    Hint: Day 14 old mouse. It typically dies within 3-6 weeks of life.

    Image was contributed by Dr. Yuying Liu | Division of Gastroenterology | Dept. of Pediatrics | UTHealth | Houston, Texas, USA.

    Please contribute to Image ID by emailing your cool images to Progressive Science.

  • June 2014

    Answer: Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs)
    Winner: None

    Identify this image and win a $25 Starbucks gift card to the first correct responder. Send your answer to editor@pscience.org.

    Hint: Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are surface stained with antibodies for CD4, molecule B and C and intracellular stained for molecule A. Molecules A, B and C are undisclosed. Cells are gated on CD4+ within lymphocytes. Identify the type of cells in the RED box.

    Data is obtained with BD FACSCalibur flow cytometer and analyzed with FlowJo software. Image was contributed by Dr. Dat Q. Tran | Pediatric Research Center | Dept. of Pediatrics | UTHealth | Houston, Texas, USA.

    Please contribute to Image ID by emailing your cool images to Progressive Science.

  • May 2014

    Answer: Right coronary artery instent restenosis
    Winner: Walid D. Fakhouri, PhD | University of Texas School of Dentistry | Houston, Texas, USA

    Identify this image and win a $25 Starbucks gift card to the first correct responder. Send your answer to editor@pscience.org.

    Image was generously contributed by Dr. Bao H. Le | Scott & White Memorial Hospital | Texas A&M University Health Science Center | Temple, Texas, USA.

    Please contribute to Image ID by emailing your cool images to Progressive Science.

  • April 2014

    Answer: Zebrafish Retina - 4 days post fertilization 
    Winner: Andrea Flores | Laboratory of Dr. Claudio Soto | Dept of Neurology | UTHealth | Houston, Texas, USA.

    Identify this image and win a $25 Starbucks gift card to the first correct responder. Send your answer to editor@pscience.org.

    Hint: H&E section of a fish embryo 4 days post fertilization.

    Image was taken with Leica M205FA stereomicroscope + DFC300 FX R2 digital camera and generously contributed by Dr. Eric C. Swindell | Pediatric Research Center | Dept of Pediatrics | UTHealth | Houston, Texas, USA.

    Please contribute to Image ID by emailing your cool images to Progressive Science.
  • March 2014

    Answer: Dorsal Root Ganglia

    Winner: None

    Identify this image and win a $25 Starbucks gift card to the first correct responder. Send your answer to editor@pscience.org.

    Hint: Sagittal section of an embryonic day (E) 14.5 mouse embryo stained with acetylated tubulin (Green) and DAPI (Blue).

    Image was taken with an Olympus BX51 microscope and DP-70 CCD camera and generously contributed by Dr. Yoshihiro Komatsu, Pediatric Research Center, Dept of Pediatrics, UTHealth.

    Please contribute to Image ID by emailing your cool images to Progressive Science.

Current Articles
ISSN 2373-2202